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© 1996-2001 Untangle Incorporated

Last Updated: Saturday, July 03, 1999

Copyrighted 1996-2001 Untangle Incorporated

1855

BULFINCH'S MYTHOLOGY:

THE AGE OF FABLE OR STORIES OF GODS AND HEROES

by Thomas Bulfinch

CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER II. PROMETHEUS AND PANDORA

CHAPTER III. APOLLO AND DAPHNE- PYRAMUS AND THISBE- CEPHALUS AND PROCRIS.

CHAPTER IV. JUNO AND HER RIVALS, IO AND CALLISTO- DIANA AND ACTAEON-LATONA AND THE RUSTICS.

CHAPTER V. PHAETON.

CHAPTER VI. MIDAS- BAUCIS AND PHILEMON.

CHAPTER VII. PROSERPINE- GLAUCUS AND SCYLLA.

CHAPTER VIII. PYGMALION- DRYOPE- VENUS AND ADONIS- APOLLO AND HYACINTHUS.

CHAPTER IX. CEYX AND HALCYONE: OR, THE HALCYON BIRDS.

CHAPTER X. VERTUMNUS AND POMONA.

CHAPTER XI. CUPID AND PSYCHE.

CHAPTER XII. CADMUS- THE MYRMIDONS.

CHAPTER XIII. NISUS AND SCYLLA- ECHO AND NARCISSUS- CLYTIE- HERO AND LEANDER.NISUS AND SCYLLA.

CHAPTER XIV. MINERVA- NIOBE.

CHAPTER XV. THE GRAEAE AND GORGONS- PERSEUS- MEDUSA- ATLAS-ANDROMEDA.

CHAPTER XVI. MONSTERS.

CHAPTER XVII. THE GOLDEN FLEECE- MEDEA

CHAPTER XVIII. MELEAGER AND ATALANTA.

CHAPTER XIX. HERCULES- HEBE AND GANYMEDE.

CHAPTER XX. THESEUS- DAEDALUS- CASTOR AND POLLUX.

CHAPTER XXI. BACCHUS- ARIADNE.

CHAPTER XXII. THE RURAL DEITIES- ERISICHTHON- RHOECUS- THE WATER DEITIES- THE CAMENAE- THE WINDS.

CHAPTER XXIII. ACHELOUS AND HERCULES- ADMETUS AND ALCESTIS-ANTIGONE- PENELOPE.

CHAPTER XXIV. ORPHEUS AND EURYDICE- ARISTAEUS- AMPHION- LINUS-THAMYRIS- MARSYAS- MELAMPUS- MUSAEUS.

CHAPTER XXV. ARION- IBYCUS- SIMONIDES- SAPPHO.

CHAPTER XXVI. ENDYMION- ORION- AURORA AND TITHONUS- ACIS AND GALATEA.

CHAPTER XXVII. THE TROJAN WAR.

CHAPTER XXVIII. THE FALL OF TROY- RETURN OF THE GREEKS-AGAMEMNON, ORESTES AND ELECTRA.

CHAPTER XXIX. ADVENTURES OF ULYSSES- THE LOTUS-EATERS- CYCLOPSE- CIRCE-SIRENS- SCYLLA AND CHARYBDIS- CALYPSO.

CHAPTER XXX. THE PHAEACIANS- FATE OF THE SUITORS.

CHAPTER XXXI. ADVENTURES OF AENEAS- THE HARPIES- DIDO- PALINURIUS.

CHAPTER XXXII. THE INFERNAL REGIONS- THE SIBYL.

CHAPTER XXXIII. AENEAS IN ITALY.CAMILLA- EVANDER- NISUS AND EURYALUS-MEZENTIUS- TURNUS.

CHAPTER XXXIV. PYTHAGORAS- EGYPTIAN DEITIES- ORACLES.

CHAPTER XXXV. ORIGIN OF MYTHOLOGY- STATUES OF GODS AND GODDESSES- POETS OF MYTHOLOGY.

CHAPTER XXXVI. MODERN MONSTERS- THE PHOENIX- BASILISK- UNICORN--SALAMANDER.

CHAPTER XXXVII. EASTERN MYTHOLOGY- ZOROASTER- HINDU MYTHOLOGY- CASTES-BUDDHA- GRAND LAMA.

CHAPTER XXXVIII. NORTHERN MYTHOLOGY- VALHALLA- THE VALKYRIOR.

CHAPTER XXXIX. THOR'S VISIT TO JOTUNHEIM.

CHAPTER XL. THE DEATH OF BALDUR- THE ELVES- RUNIC LETTERS-SKALDS- ICELAND.

CHAPTER XLI. THE DRUIDS- IONA.

CHAPTER XLII. BEOWULF.

PROVERBIAL EXPRESSIONS

#No. 1 MATERIEM superabat opus.- Ovid.

The workmanship surpassed the material.

#No. 2

Facies non omnibus una,

Nec diversa tamen, qualem decet esse sororum.- Ovid.

Their faces were not all alike, nor yet unlike, but such as those of

sisters ought to be.

#No. 3

Medio tutissimus ibis.- Ovid.

You will go most safely in the middle.

No. 4

Hic situs est Phaeton, currus auriga paterni,

Quem si non tenuit, magnis tamen excidit ausis.- Ovid.

Here lies Phaeton, the driver of his father's chariot, which if he

failed to manage, yet he fell in a great undertaking.

#No. 5

Imponere Pelio Ossam.- Virgil.

To pile Ossa upon Pelion.

#No. 6

Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes.- Virgil.

I fear the Greeks even when they offer gifts.

#No. 7

Non tali auxilio nec defensoribus istis

Tempus eget.- Virgil.

Not such aid nor such defenders does the time require. #No. 8

Incidit in Scyllam, cupiens vitare Charybdim.

He runs on Scylla, wishing to avoid Charybdis.

#No. 9

Sequitur patrem, non passibus aequis.- Virgil.

He follows his father with unequal steps.

#No. 10

Monstrum horrendum, informe, ingens, cui lumen ademptum.- Virgil.

A horrible monster, misshapen, vast, whose only eye had been put out.

#No.11

Tantaene animis coelestibus irae?- Virgil.

In heavenly minds can such resentments dwell?

#No. 12

Haud ignara mali, miseris succurrere disco.- Virgil.

Not unacquainted with distress, I have learned to succour the unfortunate.

#No. 13

Tros, Tyriusve mihi nullo discrimine agetur.- Virgil.

Whether Trojan or Tyrian shall make no difference to me.

#No. 14

Tu ne cede malis, sed contra audentior ito.- Virgil.

Yield thou not to adversity, but press on the more bravely.

#No. 15

Facilis descensus Averni;

Noctes atque dies patet atri janua Ditis;

Sed revocare gradum, superasque evadere ad auras

, Hoc opus, hic labor est.- Virgil.

The descent to Avernus is easy; the gate of Pluto stands open

night and day; but to retrace one's steps and return to the upper air,

that is the toil, that the difficulty.

#No. 16

Uno avulso non deficit alter.- Virgil.

When one is torn away another succeeds.

#No. 17

Quadrupedante putrem sonitu quatit ungula campum.- Virgil.

Then struck the hoofs of the steeds on the ground with a four-footed trampling.

#No. 18

Sternitur infelix alieno vulnere, coelumque

Adspicit et moriens dulces reminiseitur Argos.- Virgil.

He falls, unhappy, by a wound intended for another; looks up to

the skies, and dying remembers sweet Argos.

THE END .